Real Estate Development – Applying For a Property Development Permit!

The development permit is one of the keys to a successful real estate development project. Problems getting a permit approved can cause major delays and result in increases in holding costs. We like to do everything possible to ensure in advance that our development application will be approved smoothly and quickly.

Once we secure control of a site, we assemble the project team that will design and document the proposed development in accordance with the requirements of the Local Authority, the design brief and development mix.

Depending on the complexity of the project, our real estate development consultant team usually consists of:

– Property Accountant
– Property Lawyer
– Architect
– Town/Land Planner
– Civil/Hydraulics/Structural Engineer
– Land Surveyor
– Landscape Architect
– Quantity Surveyor
– Finance Broker

Other possible team members, such as acoustic and traffic specialists, may also be required by the Local Authority to submit a detailed report with the Development Permit Application.

To minimise the risk of disputes, we create a written agreement with each consultant. The agreement we typically use describes, among other things, the basis on which fees are calculated, the fee structure and services to be provided at each stage and the method by which we agree for the consultant to proceed to the next stage.

The architect will draw up plans for submission to council (these aren’t the detailed plans required for construction) that fit in with the planning regulations and the local authorities development guidelines, using a contour survey prepared by the land surveyor. The town/land planner is often involved at this initial stage, providing advice on the overall planning policies of the Local Authority.

Today most architects use sophisticated 3-D CAD software to compile drawings as it allows for ‘virtual’ buildings to be created. This system has the added benefit of creating fly-throughs and 3D images (also useful for the sales process and submission to Council) as well as documentation of the building for the Development Permit Application and for Construction by the Building Contractor.

We normally tailor our designs and standard of finishes slightly above the requirements of our target market, so they stand out from other developments on the market. This way our projects have the potential to attract a premium rental and sale price plus it makes it a lot easier to sell, if we need to.

The Local Authority will assess the submitted Development Permit Application for its impact on the neighbours, local community and the environment, typically including:

– Privacy for neighbours
– Traffic generation
– Overshadowing of neighboursAdverse impacts on air, water, and noise levels
– Amount and type of waste the project will generate
– Other areas of concern include historic districts, parks, open space, trees, and wildlife habitats

If the consultants have all done their jobs well, most of these concerns will all be addressed to the satisfaction of the Local Authority within the development application, and approval should be given within a reasonable timeframe.

The actual development approval process will obviously vary between areas, and it is continually under legislative review, so up-to-date information should be obtained from the local authority and/or the Planning consultant on your RED Team.
After a Development Permit Application is lodged with the local consenting authority or Council it would typically follow something similar to the process below:

– Initial Review
– Expert Referral
– Advertising and Notification Period
– Assessment
– Outcome

Several factors can delay the development application consent process which can end up becoming costly to a property developer. Here are some of the most common assessment delays:

– insufficient information
– non-compliance with development rules
– poor designs creating unacceptable impact on the neighbourhood
– objections from neighbours or other groups
– unsatisfactory impacts on trees
– complexity of assessment reports
– external referral delays

It’s not necessarily the end of the process if Council has refused the development permit application. An experienced architect and planning consultant can greatly assist in challenging a planning decision.

New Home Interior Design – Plan Ahead

By failing to plan properly well ahead of time for your new home interior design, you could end up feeling too overwhelmed with other work to actually plan out how you want your new home to look. In addition, by the time all your belongings are moved into the new home, planning for the new home interior design will be close to impossible with all the clutter lying about.

Getting Started

When planning for your new home interior design, begin first by spending time in your new home and taking a good look around. Keep in mind that it is much easier to plan for a new home interior design when the house is still empty and bare. Visit your new house at least twice before you begin to lay out plans for your interior design.

Make sure that you visit at least once in the morning to see how the light plays around the rooms during the early morning. Then visit again in the afternoon to see how the rooms look and feel in the afternoon light. Remember that your new home interior design will work better if it is designed to harmonize with the light to achieve that warm, sunny and homey feeling.

When visiting your new home, take along a sketch pad and pencil with you. Never mind if you cannot paint or draw. What is really important here is that you note down all of the important parts of the house and then take the time to plan out what you will do with it. For instance, you will want to get the dimension and shape of the living room.

You will be taking measurements for drapes and window coverings. And if you intend to buy new furniture, you need to select pieces that will not look overly large for the space nor make the area look crowded. By jotting down the exact size and shape of the room and home interior design, you will be able to determine the types of furniture and fixtures needed in order to make that room look like your own, containing your own special touch.

Home Interior Designer Requirements – 10 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Hiring a Professional

To help eliminate the frustrations of deciding whether to tackle a home improvement project by yourself, or hire a professional home interior designer, I’ve created a list of questions to ask yourself that will assist you with making a decision.

Improving your home by redesigning the look and feel of several rooms all at once takes forethought and planning to achieve the desired results that you have in your mind. Although you might have a creative flair for using color in your home, and your friends and family have told you that your decorating and design talents are exceptional, how do you really know if you want to take on the project by yourself?

Here are ten questions to assist you in the process. After you have finished jotting down your answers, you just might have made your decision (especially if you answered no to more than one-third of the questions).

1. When looking at your calendar, do you have large blocks of time available every week for your interior design project tasks?

2. Is it easy and natural for you to place a paint sample next to a fabric swatch and imagine how the colors and materials will look in the room you want to decorate?

3. When you think about re-doing three rooms in your home, do the required tasks feel overwhelming to you considering that you’ll have to do everything by yourself?

4. Have you already purchased paint and accessories for one of the rooms, but now you’re not sure about the colors you’ve chosen?

5. Did you find inspiration for redesigning one or more of the rooms in your home from a picture in a magazine, but now you’re not sure if you like the style, whether retro, eco-friendly, minimalist, traditional or contemporary?

6. Are you the sole person making all the color and design decisions, or do you live with someone who totally disagrees with the changes you’re about to make?

7. Do your plans include more than decorating with paints and fabrics?

8. To achieve your desired goals for improving your home, will it be necessary to knock down walls, and relocate water sources and electrical components?

9. Do you have money available now because you were thinking of buying a new home, but have recently decided to stay in your current home rather than moving to another home and starting all over?

10. Do you live in an historic part of town and you’d like to have the inside of your home reflect the area where you live, but you don’t have a clue where to start?